Human Touch

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“jobs that involve creativity, social interaction, and a human touch are hard to automate”

Bruce Mau

In global libraries

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Eleonore Schönmaier’s books can be found in libraries globally including Poets House Library, New York, USA,  Helsinki University in Finland,  Bibliographie du Quebec, in Canada, Falvey Memorial Library  at Villanova University in Pennsylvania, USA,  and Biblioteca Madre Maria Teresa Guevara, Universidad del Sagrado Corazón in Puerto Rico among others.

Review in Canadian Literature

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“Eleonore Schönmaier’s Dust Blown Side of the Journeytakes an ecological approach with its rich selection of nature poetry, but her collection is also intimate and self-reflective…Her poems range in national settings, from the Canadian boreal forest, to the Balinese jungle, to the Greek islands, to the ‘remote mountains of Ecuador’…Capturing moments of human greed and human kindness, of striving for community, and of unapologetic joy, Schönmaier’s work is rejuvenating, and offers both a sense of peace and a time for introspection.” —Monica Sousa (read the full review in Canadian Literature).

 

 

Photo by Eleonore Schönmaier

Featured Poem

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Conversation (from Treading Fast Rivers) is today’s featured poem as part of the League of Canadian Poets Poetry Pause.  Migrations  (from Wavelengths of Your Song) was featured on November 16.  Both poems have been set to music by Emily Doolittle.

“With Poetry Pause, the League will circulate one poem a day, Monday-Friday, each month, all year. For your daily dose of poetics, you can subscribe to our Poetry Pause newsletter or find the poems on our website where they will be archived.”

Thanksgiving

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Eleonore Schönmaier’s poem “Thanksgiving” is included in the recently released Another Dysfunctional Cancer Poem Anthology edited by Priscila Uppal and Meaghan Strimas and published by Mansfield Press. The anthology is included in Chatelaine Magazine’s best books of 2018 list. The book also includes work by Teva Harrison, Molly Peacock, A.F. Moritz, Pamela Mordecai, Christian Bök, Catherine Graham, Canisia Lubrin, Bardia Sinaee, Ron Charach, Adam Sol, Emily Schultz, Jónína Kirton, and Zoe Whittall, and many others.

“Their work offers us new ways of seeing, understanding, and representing this ordinary and extraordinary experience. Current statistics predict 1 in 2 people will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. We need more art to understand the complexity and dimensions of what this means. This is an anthology for anyone who knows someone. This is an anthology for everyone.”

Review in Malahat

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“Eleonore Schönmaier’s [third] poetry collection, Dust Blown Side of the Journey, is the work of a poet who has mastered her craft…featuring a beautifully elaborate intertwining of images…connections continue from poem to poem…akin to recurring melodies or riffs across distinct movements of a composition…poems both captivating and moving.” –Emma Skagan  (read the full article in The Malahat Review)

 

Photo by Eleonore Schönmaier

“Conversation” in three Scotland concerts

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On September 5, 6, & 7 the St Andrews New Music Ensemble  performed three concerts  featuring Emily Doolittle’s  Conversation (based on a poem by Eleonore Schönmaier from Treading Fast Rivers).  

Conversation is a 12-minute work for soprano and chamber ensemble, based on the sounds of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) in haul-out. Schönmaier’s poem explores what Doolittle describes as a ‘slightly uncanny sympathy between humans and grey seals’.”


 

 

 

Heartwood: poems for the love of trees

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Heartwood  has now been published.  The anthology includes my poem “Knot” and is over 300 pages which includes beautiful original photographs of trees.   You can order your own copy online.

“Heartwood is a Canadian anthology of poems that celebrates trees. Published by the League of Canadian Poets, this anthology features poets from every province and territory celebrating the immeasurable value trees have for the environment and for the soul. Poets wrote about a tree they loved as a child, a park they sat in, or a forest they go to for invigoration and inspiration. The planet needs trees to survive. Poets from across Canada have written poems to ensure that the message is heard. Compiled and edited by Lesley Strutt. Foreword by Diana Beresford-Kroger. Original photographs by Chuck Willemsen.”

Live-Retrieved Memory: the Poetry of Eleonore Schönmaier

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“Time in music is one way to organise chaos, and musical polyphony uses multilayering as a form of time travel.  This is similar to the layering found in life-retrieved memory.  Time for me isn’t linear but the coexistence of multiple layers and I write poetry because I want this polyphony.”  Paul Hamann quotes Eleonore Schönmaier in his feature about her writing in the newly released issue of The New Quarterly .

Editor Pamela Mulloy in her introductory essay for the issue writes: In “Live-Retrieved Memory: The Poetry of Eleonore Schönmaier” Paul Hamann examines his former student’s work and delves into her theory on a “live-retrieved” memory, a conjoining that might be found with merging the past from our letters and journals together with the live memories we carry with us through the years.

Photograph by Eleonore Schönmaier

Boreal Forest

The landscape of my childhood is now a UNESCO Mixed World Heritage Site.  The nearly 30,000 square kilometers in the heart of Canada’s boreal forest is designated as having “outstanding universal value to all of humanity.”

 

 

“There are few great forests left in the world. And even fewer where indigenous people have been taking care of the land for thousands of years. But such a rare place exists…In Ojibwe we call it Pimachiowin Aki (Pim–MATCH–cho–win Ahh–KEY) or “the land that gives life.” Ojibwe (Anishinaabe) Elders teach us that the land provides fresh water, healthy food and clean air for many people near and far.”